Three Students Win NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

Three Students Win NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

NSF Graduate Research Fellows Isaiah Borne, Taylor Hatridge, and Maggie Manspeaker

Three PhD students in Georgia Tech’s School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering (ChBE) won 2019 National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships: Isaiah Borne, Taylor Hatridge, and Maggie Manspeaker.

“This is the hallmark graduate fellowship award for PhD students in the U.S.,” says Professor J. Carson Meredith, associate chair of graduate studies for ChBE.

NSF’s competitive Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) is the country’s oldest fellowship program that directly supports graduate students in various STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) fields. Fellows benefit from a three-year annual stipend of $34,000 along with a $12,000 cost of education allowance for tuition and fees (paid to the institution) as well as opportunities for international research and professional development.

Borne (pictured above left), a first year PhD student who is co-advised by Professor Chris Jones and Associate Professor Ryan Lively, won the fellowship for his proposal to study “Engineering porous liquids for acid gas separations.”

Hatridge (pictured above center), a first-year PhD student advised by Professor Chris Jones, won for her proposal, “A Systematic Design Study of Immobilized Dirhodium Catalysts for use in CH Functionalization Reactions.”

Manspeaker (pictured above right), a second-year PhD student in Bioengineering advised by Associate Professor Susan Thomas, won for her proposal, “Lymph node-targeting nanotechnology for breast cancer chemoimmunotherapy.”

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NSF Graduate Research Fellows Isaiah Borne, Taylor Hatridge, and Maggie Manspeaker

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